Barefoot Sewing

Costumes

Considering commissioning a costume from Barefoot Sewing? Check out these work samples to get an idea of what kind of costumes we create.

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  1. Chobits: Chi Costume
    $999.99

    Chi by the Numbers:

    • 328,020 stitches in the skirt embroidery alone - that’s 2.6 miles of thread
    • 24 hours to embroider and trim skirt and bodice
    • 4 hours patterning and cutting out fabric
    • 12 hours sewing
    • 3 hours applying grommets
    • 5 hours designing & printing on 3D printer
    • 8 hours sanding & painting accessories
    • 2 hours styling wig
    • Total costume construction time: 57 hours

    To make this dress even more special, Chi was made with leftover silk from my wedding dress.

    Pictures courtesy of SkyKing Cosplay & Photography for the photoshoot, and David Troeh for the con floor shot.

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  2. Destiny: Warlock Iron Regalia Vestments Fleece Robe
    $999.99

    This fully lined fleece robe features appliqued designs from Destiny's Iron Regalia Vestments in the client's preferred color scheme.

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  3. Doctor Horrible Howie Lab Coat Costume
    $999.99

    Looking for a howie lab coat pattern? You can get the Doctor Horrible Lab Coat Pattern as an instant download on our Etsy store!

    Want to buy a finished coat? Please contact us to get on our commission schedule. Dr. Horrible coats in white, off-white, or red are $140 plus shipping. We're typically booked 3-6 months out, so be sure to plan ahead!

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  4. DuckTales: Magica De Spell Costume
    $999.99

    I created this Magica De Spell dress from the DuckTales universe for a commissioner to wear to Zenkaikon 2014. It's made of high-quality Monece satin. I modified McCall's 2041 pattern by lengthening the sleeves, adding cuffs, and creating the scalloped hem.

    Photos courtesy Anna Muchia and DeathCom Multimedia.

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  5. Ender's Game: Dragon Army Flash Suit Costume
    $999.99

    Awards:
    Best in Show, Snowflake KC, 2/2/14
    Best in Show, ConQuesT KC, 5/24/14
    Best Workmanship in the Master Class, Archon St. Louis, 10/4/14

    This flash suit from the 2013 film Ender's Game is the most ambitious costume I've attempted to date. Between gathering reference images, drafting patterns and construction, I spent more than 80 hours on the suit - and that doesn't include the armor!

    The boot covers were made from scratch by a process known as draping. Simply put, I taped butcher paper onto a base shoe and duct tape dummy leg until it looked right, then drew pattern lines and used those pattern pieces to make the final product. The cover has a velcro closure, so I can easily tie the shoe underneath.

    I'm still not quite sure how I pulled off the gloves. They were made from scratch as well, and I only used draping on the wrists to get the right shape.

    A friend drafted a form-fitting leggings pattern for my Vanellope costume, so I reused it to make these pants. I drew the appropriate shapes on the pattern, cut them out, and used those as pattern pieces.

    The jacket was based on Simplicity pattern 2341. I traced the pattern onto butcher paper, assembled it with Scotch tape, put it on my mannequin and traced out applique shapes, just like the leggings. The primary challenge with the jacket was its stiffness and bulk. I used Aleene's Stretchable Flexible Fabric Glue to attach Peltex (think super dense quilt batting that holds its shape) to the silver spandex, then appliqued each piece onto the base jacket. The darker gray, rubber-looking bits are actually pieces of a yoga mat stitched to the base coat.

    The shoulder and knee armor were carved from Styrofoam and coated in Apoxie Sculpt to ensure a smooth finish. We then vacuformed the masters to make the final pieces, and fiberglassed the insides for stability. We used epoxy putty to attach the armor to the jacket and leggings.

    The neck armor was made with a combination of papercrafting and wirework. After the master was complete, we vacuformed it as well. See a video of the vacuforming process here.

    My husband designed the flash gun in Sketchup, then 3D printed all the components. He designed custom electronics to make the side spinners and the bulb at the end light up. Check out the video of the gun in action here.

    The helmet was the biggest challenge of the whole costume. After my husband helped me make a plaster head cast, I used plasticene clay to sculpt a helmet. I then used Rebound 25 brush-on rubber to make a mold of the clay base, and cast the helmet in resin. We vacuformed the face plate, and the Dragon Army emblem on the back is a vinyl decal printed for us by a friend.

    Visit my Pinterest board for reference shots and construction photos.

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  6. Final Fantasy Tactics: Blue Mage Costume
    $999.99

    I created this Blue Mage costume for a bridesmaid in a Final Fantasy themed wedding. (I also made Quistis and Fang costumes for the wedding.)

    The shirt and leggings were made from a modified pattern out of stretch cotton. Since the fabric was not available in the exact color we wanted, I dyed it with Rit.

    The overcoat was also made from a modified pattern - primarily changed for the collar and cuffs. It is made from cotton twill, cling-free polyester lining, and lots of fusible interfacing! 

    The hat was made from scratch, since I couldn't find a good sailor hat pattern. The feather was the biggest challenge, since it has such a distinctive shape; I accomplished that by gluing the feather to a thick wire bent at just the right angle, then attached the whole thing to the hat.

    The scarf, brooch, belt, pouches and tights were provided by the commissioner.

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  7. Final Fantasy VII: Aeris Gainsborough Costume
    $999.99

    I made this costume of Aeris Gainsborough from the movie Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children in 2009. It is completely screen-accurate, down to the jacket's fabric (do you know how hard it is to find maroon denim?), buttons and seam lines. The flower basket was made by my husband.

    Photograph courtesy of Flickr user wcm777.

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  8. Final Fantasy VIII: Quistis Trepe SeeD Uniform Costume
    $999.99

    I made this Quistis cosplay for a bridesmaid at a Final Fantasy themed wedding. (I also made Blue Mage and Fang costumes for the wedding.)

    Instead of the traditional black SeeD uniform, we opted to make hers in shades of blue more appropriate to a wedding. The jacket and skirt are made from cotton twill edged with homemade satin bias tape. I doodled the design for the lapels, then scanned the design to create an embroidery file. I also made the tie.

    I designed and 3D printed the tie clip, then printed and applied a Balamb Garden sticker to it, and sealed everything with varnish.

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  9. Final Fantasy XIII: Oerba Yun Fang Costume
    $999.99

    I made this Fang costume for a bridesmaid at a Final Fantasy themed wedding. (I also made Blue Mage and Quistis costumes for the wedding.)

    Fang's wrap is made from silk dupioni, and all the details were hand painted with the help of a stencil my husband designed and 3D printed. He also created and 3D printed the buckles on her belt.

    The bustier was made from a heavily modified pattern, and the arm guards were made from scratch, both with faux leather. I used cotton twill and 1/4" cotton cord to create the ribbed belt.

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  10. Formal Ball Gown
    $999.99

    This ball gown, made for Naka-Kon's formal ball in 2015, was designed by the client. The ribbons posed an interesting challenge, as I had to find something that would stand straight up without support. I ended up using wired ribbon with the wire removed, because the sturdy edging helped the ribbon keep its curled shape, but the wire itself would have snagged the delicate satin.

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  11. Harry Potter: Year 5 Quidditch Uniform Costume
    $999.99

    This Quidditch uniform is comprised of no less than seven pieces: Hand-dyed athletic mesh shirt and pants with appliqued stripes; an athletic mesh overshirt/robe with appliqued stripes, heat transfer vinyl team number and officially licensed Gryffindor patch; and faux leather arm and leg bracers. Goggles, gloves, wand, broom and shoes provided by client and model Amber Harvey

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  12. Homestuck: Trickster Jane Costume
    $999.99

    This Trickster Jane dress was commissioned for Naka-Kon 2015. The trickiest part of this costume was the scalloped trim at the base of the dress, which took several hours to complete. The chest emblem is fully embroidered.

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  13. Journey: Main Character Costume
    $999.99

    I made this costume from the main character of the PS3 game "Journey" in 2014. The poncho was based on a cloak pattern, and the cowl was drafted from scratch. I made 3D printed stencils for the yellow portions of the costume, and used Jacquard fabric paint to fill them in.

    This costume took approximately 4 hours to cut and sew, and approximately 13 hours of hand painting from start to finish!

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  14. Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions: Takanashi Rikka Costume
    $999.99

    This Rikka costume was commissioned for Naka-Kon 2015. It consists of a button-up collared shirt with cuffs, a shrug, a corset, a spiral skirt and a purchased petticoat. The shrug and skirt were made completely from scratch, and the corset and shirt were made from heavily modified patterns.

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  15. Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions: Togashi Yuuta Costume
    $999.99

    This Yuuta cosplay was commissioned for Naka-Kon 2015. The biggest challenge on this costume was the collar, which stands up under its own weight thanks to multiple layers of fusible interfacing. The adjustable straps on the legs were made from almost eight yards of faux leather belting. The "arrowhead" on the tip of the shoulder chain was 3D printed.

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  16. Marvel Comics: America Chavez Costume
    $999.99

    I created the jacket for this America Chavez costume for a friend to wear to DragonCon 2013. I modified a jacket pattern for cut, fit and to add blocks of color, and embroidered the stars on the sleeves and back.

    Photos courtesy Bryan Humphrey, Mad Scientist Photography.

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  17. Marvel Comics: Blue Marvel Costume
    $999.99

    This all-in-one Blue Marvel suit is made from heavyweight moleskin spandex. I used a heavily altered pattern for the main body, and fashioned the boot covers and cape from scratch. Slip-on shoes are attached to the boot covers with Barge contact cement, and the cape is sewn into the suit's shoulders.

    The colors on this suit are true to the reference image. I'm just more skilled with a needle and thread than I am with Photoshop!

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  18. Marvel Comics: Captain Marvel Costume
    $999.99

    Awards and Notable Mentions:
    Featured costume, Marvel's Costoberfest, 10/27/15
    First runner up, Elite Comics Halloween Costume Contest, 10/31/15
    Costume Tumblr post shared by Captain Marvel writer Kelly Sue DeConnick, 11/9/15

     

    In 2015 I fell in love with Captain Marvel. As I'm a blonde in the good Captain's general age range, I decided to tackle her iconic suit.

    Part I: The Bodysuit

    I had help from a friend to draft the bodysuit pattern to my exact measurements, then took over the design process and meticulously measured out the details. Because of where the lines lie on the main pattern, some of the pieces are smaller than a finger, but well worth the effort. Each piece of the pattern was cut out and carefully labeled, including a directional arrow so I could match up the grain of the fabric precisely. I used a silver gel pen to mark all the pattern pieces on the back of the fabric, since using chalk would have required me to press on the spandex, which could have stretched it out of position. If you're curious about the materials I used, I have them all linked on my Pinterest.

    Sewing the bodysuit was a challenge, because the spandex was very slightly ribbed on one side. It grabbed and wouldn't slide in one direction, but slipped easily going the opposite direction, so I had to pin it within an inch of its life. I used a walking foot and jersey needle to ease the way. The two things I'm the most proud of, sewing-wise, are the piping (I've never done piping on a costume before, and this is spandex piping, which is extra finicky!) and how smooth and straight the zipper ended up. Faced with sewing a stretch fabric to a non-stretch zipper, I had an epiphany. I grabbed some of the tearaway interfacing I use for my embroidery machine, sandwiched everything together, stitched it, and tore out the paper, and it's the prettiest darned spandex zipper I've ever made. I'll never use any other technique for it again.

    Another particular set of things to point out, if you'll excuse the pun, are the points on the star emblem. I had difficulty getting the angles at each point exactly right using the sewing machine, so I hand-stitched the points of every angle in the star.

    Part II: The Gloves

    The gloves were a big challenge compared to the suit. Not only did I have to be spot on with my seams regardless of the spandex ridges, I had to be very precise in the measurements I used to make the pattern, or the gloves would look floppy and sloppy or cut off my circulation. I started out by tracing my arm and worked from there; the gloves you see in the photos here are the third iteration of the pattern. (The other pieces in the photo below are the tops of the sleeves.)

    Adding studs to the gloves posed a problem, because if the spandex stretched too much the studs would pop out, and the studs attached via prongs which could cause unsightly snags on the spandex. To make everything work I carefully attached the studs in the appropriate spots, then topstitched a piece of Peltex stabilizer not much wider than the studs to the inside of the glove. The Peltex keeps the spandex from stretching on the top side, and protects the other side of the glove (and my arm) from being scratched by the stud prongs.

    Part III: The Pin

    I'm rather proud of the pin, because I created it completely from scratch, starting with the 3D model. I'm not much of a 3D designer (unlike my husband, who creates crazy complex things), so it took me quite a long time to get it right, but the basic shape came out very nicely. I used drywall compound to smooth out the ridges, sanded everything smooth, spray painted it, and super glued a pin to the back.

    Part IV: The Boots

    The boots are ones that I found on clearance. However, the boots I bought were brown, not red! The original, unaltered boot is on the right side of the photo. The boot on the left has been carefully scrubbed with cotton squares soaked in acetone to remove the finish and make the boots more receptive to paint. I used Nu-Life crimson spraypaint after carefully taping off the soles and zippers. I used the same studs on the boots as I did on the gloves, and glued dots of leather behind each stud on the inside of the boot to keep the stud prongs from damaging the legs of my suit.

    Just for fun, I also got scanned with a 3D scanner, so here's a full 360 degree view of the costume!

    Finished costume photos by Shintaro Design.

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  19. Marvel Comics: Doctor Strange Costume
    $999.99

    This fully lined coat made from wool suiting was made from a heavily modified pattern. It features a carefully pieced front and handmade sash.

    Pants, boots, gloves, Eye of Agamotto and magic circle provided by model JR Cosplay. Photos by HSL Photography.

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  20. Marvel Comics: Firestar Costume
    $999.99

    I created this Firestar costume for a client in 2015. A friend helped me draft a pattern for the suit base, and I created patterns for the gloves and boot covers from scratch. The gloves and boot covers include a Peltex stabilizer lining to help the flames keep their shape. The mask was provided by the client.

    Photo by Uyen Tran.

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  21. Marvel Movies: Genderbent Loki Costume
    $999.99

    I made this Lady Loki costume for a commissioner in 2014. It is made of high-quality Monece satin, just one step down from bridal satin.

    The dress and coat were spliced together from Simplicity 3685 and McCall's 3826, with many, many design changes. The most time-consuming addition was all the gold bias tape edging, since I used 18 yards of it and it was all homemade, not pre-packaged! (I treated myself and purchased a bias tape machine, but it still took a considerable amount of time to make and more than two hours to pin on before stitching.)

    The horns, headband centerpiece, and cape clasp were all 3D printed from my husband's designs, then attached with E6000. The headband is made from satin over Peltex, which is like very dense quilt batting or extremely stiff polar fleece. The back encases a strip of elastic to ensure a tight fit. The cape clasp attaches with rare earth magnets.

    All credit for the costume concept and reference image goes toBakaNekoSango.

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  22. Marvel Movies: Jail Cell Loki Costume
    $999.99

    The hubby decided he needed a new Loki costume for the Thor: The Dark World premiere. I drafted the pattern from scratch based on his measurements, since it was a fairly simple design. The trickiest part was the patterned suede, since nothing comes in that pattern. It’s the same as the pattern on the scarf he wore in The Avengers!

    Since it was made for the premiere, we only had a couple of screenshots to work from, but fortunately it's not too terribly inaccurate. (This naturally did not stop me from leaping out of my seat and clawing the jacket after the movie, wailing about how terrible it was.)

    Hubby designed and 3D printed a stencil for the pattern, and I spent approximately 8 hours carefully filling in both suede panels with fabric paint - a mixture of matte brown and velveteen black, which makes it look soft and suede-like instead of shiny like most fabric paint.

    The undershirt was made by hacking together a kimono pattern with a regular jacket sleeve pattern. Each line you see is a row of stitches - it took me about 6 hours to prepare the fabric before I could think about sewing the pieces together, which took another 2 hours.

    The embroidery on the shirts pictured in the last image was also done by me. In addition to the back embroidery, the front pocket of each shirt says "Loki's Army" in gold thread.

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  23. Marvel Movies: Loki Pajamas
    $999.99

    I am Loki, of Asgard, and I am burdened with glorious naptime.

    These pajamas (my actual winter pajamas, which double as a super comfy convention costume) and their matching sleeveless bathrobe are made of stretch cotton and polar fleece. Together with the Loki helmet hat, plush Chitauri scepter, fleece Tesseract case bag and obligatory Thor plushie, this is definitely my comfiest costume ever.

    Photos courtesy Geoff Voss.

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  24. Marvel Movies: The Winter Soldier Costume
    $999.99

    This costume included a big first for me: Working with leather. After scouring local thrift stores, we found two leather coats that could be carved into pieces and remade into Bucky's Winter Soldier coat. I derived the pattern for the jacket from my Doctor Horrible coat pattern, and I made the silver glove from scratch.

    My husband created the bionic arm with Worbla, a thermoplastic. The arm features a fully functional elbow joint, so the only thing he can't do is raise his arm above his head.

    Photos courtesy SPC Portrait Art, Matt Schott, and the Iron Brothers of Topeka (IBOT). Final image is for reference and is not our costume!

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  25. My Little Pony: Light-Up Twilight Sparkle Costume
    $999.99

    Awards
    Second place, Midwest Brony Fest 2016

    This version of Twilight Sparkle is based on Amelie Belcher's fanart, which was published before Equestria Girls came out. The costume debuted at Naka-Kon 2015.

    You can't see the best part of this costume in photos - because it actually sparkles! Using an Arduino microcomputer, an accelerometer, and a couple dozen LEDs, the skirt twinkles whenever I move. I used conductive thread to stitch all the LEDs together on one of the skirt's underlayers. The microcomputer and 9V battery pack are located in a hidden pocket.

    See the skirt in action here.

    The book is one of my favorite props. I bought a book box from Michael's, sanded it down, and painted it to look like Star Swirl the Bearded's book. It's hollow on the inside, and doubles as my purse. The shirt was store-bought, but I dyed it to Twilight's particular shade of purple.

    Reference photo via Amelie Belcher's DeviantArt page.

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